Shameless advertising- Using a fake UFO to promote grocery store in San Luis Rio Colorado, Mx

During the Mid-90s, a renewed interest on the subject of UFOs was sparked in modern culture by movies like “Independence Day” to actual events like the Phoenix lights on 1997. It seemed like one could not get away from UFOs. If Hollywood was taking advantage of the attention that was being given to UFOs, why couldn’t others? This was the case of a market store in San Luis Rio Colorado Sonora, Mexico (a border town) in the early 1990s. B&H was a local grocery store located in San Luis where the owner got the idea to use the public’s interest on UFOs to promote his store. Using a remote control airplane and customizing to look like an UFO, the owner of B&H started flying his remote control “UFO” around San Luis, sometimes even flying it close to the border so people in the U.S. could see it too.

Maria Muñiz remembers how the fake UFO flew just over nearby houses and  landed somewhere on the outskirts of the city. Though like many, she noticed something weird on the side of the strange aircraft. What were the people seeing in the side of the fake UFO that was even stranger than the actual aircraft? Well, the fake UFO was using electronic signage that had a message promoting the B&H store. Even though there were some people who actually read the message and knew immediately that it was a marketing ploy, those who saw the fake UFO from afar actually fell for the trick and thought that they were witnessing a real UFO. With time, the UFO craze died down and eventually people stopped seeing the B&H UFO. Concurrently, B&H closed down some time later.

Such a story makes one think how some people can be clever enough to pull schemes like these and trick people. Next time a UFO is flying near the skies, pay close attention because it might not be what it seems.

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Strange blue ights flying over Celaya, MX – Folklore or UFO activity?

When interviewing Dolores Montenegro about her UFO experience in the 1980s, one could not help but notice how the traditional folklore of a community can be interpreted as UFO sightings in the modern era. Dolores used to work in a factory called ACROS that was located on the city of Celaya, Guanajuato Mexico. One night in 1984, she completed her shift at one in the morning and took the bus that would eventually take her home in a one hour ride away from Celaya. The bus passed through the countryside and its hills. It was here where she noticed a strange light moving through the area. She described it as a blue glowing sphere made of flames that was flying up and down through the hills and fields at high speeds. She was not the only one who noticed this event as several co-workers who were also in the bus witnessed it. However, the people on the bus, including Dolores, did not think they were witnessing a UFO of extraterrestrial origins, but instead they thought it was a witch, or in Spanish, a “bruja”. She went on to explain that it was pretty common seeing these strange lights in Guanajuato and sometimes they would even chase people. There is even a place outside of Celaya called “El Cerro de las Brujas,” translating to “The Mountain of the Witches,” where these lights are sometimes seen. The way people in this part of Mexico described the strange lights is identical to many UFO reports throughout the last 50 yrs.

Could people in Guanajuato be confusing UFOs with supernatural beings of their folklores?

On Jan. 16, 2004 a young police officer named Leonardo Samaniego Gallegos was patrolling the streets of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon Mexico when he was attack by a weird being he described as a witch. When doing a sketch of said creature, it resembled  an alien rather than a witch.  There have also been many reports of flying objects and even flying humanoids throughout the Monterrey area.

Is this another case of mistaking actual UFO activities for local folklore? Are the people imagining what they are seeing or mistaking it for a natural phenomenon? Like always, it is up to the reader to decide.

–Abel Muñiz Jr., UFOs Over the Desert